BIOGRAPHY

PRINTING

The Black House

From 1970-73, Jones spent three years documenting life in what the press derisively came to call "The Black House." The evocative images are some of Jones' most powerful and were the subject of Jones' solo Exhibition at The Photographers' Gallery in 1977. In 2006 The Black House series of photographs was published as a book of the same name by Prestel.

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CONTACT

For enquiries or photography print prices please contact the archive  using the following information.

gallery@lucy-bell.com
+44 (0)1424 434 828

For Licensing requests please email
requests@topfotos.co.uk

Vintage prints are available from Michael Hoppen Gallery gallery@michaelhoppengallery.com 020 7352 3649

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Biography

Born in London in 1936, Colin Jones' creative life followed an unorthodox trajectory: From a working-class childhood in the East End of London to dancing in the English Royal Ballet. Jones bought his first camera whilst on tour in Japan, running an errand for Dame Margot Fonteyn. He soon became aphotographer for The Observer in 1962 and never looked back. Colin Jones is one of the most celebrated and prolific photographers of post-war Britain.

Jones, who was known as "The George Orwell of Photography," has documented facets of British social history over the years as diverse as the vanishing industrial working lives of the Northeast (Grafters), marginalised Afro-Caribbean youth in London (The Black House) and the high-octane hedonism of Swinging London in the 1960's with his iconic images of The Who early in their career (Maximum Who).

His work has been published in every major publication with any regard for the image, including Life, National Geographic and in many supplements for the major broadsheets. Jones has had exhibitions at The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC, The Photographers' Gallery in London, and at many other venues internationally.

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Press features

Past Exhibitions

Beatles to Bowie - National Portrait Gallery

60s Exposed

December 2009 - January 2010

Colin Jones

Odyssey II

December 2003

Here We Are: Burberry

Celebrating British Photography

18 September - 1st October 2017

Colin Jones - 50 Years of The Who

Photoaumnales - Beauvais France

20 September - 16 November 2014

History Is Now: Hayward

7 Artists Take On Britain

2015

Made You Look: Dandyism & Black Masculinity

Photographers Gallery

July - September 2016

Tate Modern London

The Black House, London 571 Holloway Road 1973

2016

Beetles+Huxley

An Ideal For Living (Joint exhibition)

27th July – 17th Sept 2016

The Photographers Gallery

Made You Look (Joint Exhibition)

15th July – 25th Sept 2016

Michael Hoppen Gallery

Retrospective

5th May – 1st June 2016

Lucy Bell Gallery

On Ballet

8th July – 8th Aug 2015

Proud Chelsea

A Life With The Royal Ballet

29th Jan – 1st Mar 2015

Proud Camden

50 Years of The Who

6th Feb – 23rd Mar 2014

James Hyman Gallery

Country Matters (Joint Exhibition)

Sept – Nov 2013

Michael Hoppen Gallery

Jerusalem

7th Oct – 12th Nov 2011

Topfoto gallery

The Glory of English Ballet

18th July – 26th Aug 2011

Proud Central

The Who: In the Beginning

24th Sept – 15th Nov 2009

Hoopers Gallery

Classic Dance

October 2008

Michael Hoppen Gallery

The Black House

1st June – 1st July 2007

Britart Gallery

Stars of the East (Joint Exhibition)

1st – 31st Dec 2002

The Photographers Gallery

The Black House

4 May – 4 June 1977

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Printing

Professor Colin Jones uses traditional darkroom techniques and prints all his own black-and-white images from his darkroom at home.

Silver Gelatin 

The traditional process for producing black and white prints is a wet chemical process whereby exposing a piece of paper coated with silver nitrate held together in a gelatin layer to light via a black and white negative film producing a print. 

The paper is negative and the film is also negative with two negatives producing a positive image on the paper.Prints produced this way are termed silver gelatin and are most sort after by serious collectors. 

No two prints are exactly alike as this is an organic process and each print will be affected by the depletion of the developer, chemical temperature and processing time furthermore if the printer adds or removes light by what is called ‘dodging or burning in’ then this too will produce slightly different effects on each print.

Silver Gelatin
The traditional process for producing black and white prints is a wet chemical process whereby exposing a piece of paper coated with silver nitrate held together in a gelatin layer to light via a black and white negative film producing a print.

The paper is negative and the film is also negative with two negatives producing a positive image on the paper.


Prints produced this way are termed silver gelatin and are most sort after by serious collectors.

No two prints are exactly alike as this is an organic process and each print will be affected by the depletion of the developer, chemical temperature and processing time furthermore if the printer adds or removes light by what is called ‘dodging or burning in’ then this too will produce slightly different effects on each print.